Will/Braffitt/Johnson/Cook ancestry - Person Sheet
Will/Braffitt/Johnson/Cook ancestry - Person Sheet
NameRhoda Fleak
Birth11 Nov 1822, Athens, OH1
Death16 Apr 1902, Athens, OH1
BurialBethel Cemetery, Coolville, Athens, OH1
FatherJohn Fleak (1778-1833)
MotherElizabeth Brookhart (1782-1865)
Misc. Notes
!BIRTH-DEATH-BURIAL: Bethel Cemetery, Coolville, Athens, OH1, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/130056052
!CENSUS: 23-Sep-1850 Troy, Athens, OH, 1001/1019, Rhoda Griffin, children Edward Griffin, Amanda Griffin, Sarah Griffin, John M. Griffin
!CENSUS: 11-Jul-1860 Troy, Athens, OH, 805/785, Rhoda Griffin, 8 children including son Edward Griffin
!CENSUS: 06-Jul-1870 Troy, Athens, OH, 58/57, Rhody Griffin, 6 children including son Mather Griffin and daughter Ida J. Griffin
!CENSUS: 03-Jun-1880 Troy, Athens, OH871, 10/10, Rhoda Griffin, children Charles Griffin, Ida Griffin, Lena Griffin, Mary Griffin
!CENSUS: Jun-1900 Troy, Athens, OH, Rhoda Griffin, daughter Ida J. Griffin
!NOTE: The 1900 census is interesting. Catharine Grffin and Rhoda Griffin appear in adjacent households, but the birthplaces of their parents is different. The death certificate for Catherine gives her parents as John Fleek and Elizabeth Brookhart.
!REFERENCE: 18-Jun-1902 Western Christian Advocate, page 28, Rhoda Fleak Griffin (1822-1902), https://books.google.com/books?id=YM9OAAAAYAAJ&...p;hl=en&sa=X&;ved=2ahUKEwi2kpyugdreAhWFuVMKHVL2CnM4ChDoATAAegQIBRAB#v=onepage&q=%22rhoda%20fleak%22&f=false
!REFERENCE: 1904, son Matthew D. Griffin (Mather Daniel Griffin), https://books.google.com/books?id=yf40AQAAMAAJ&...=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiXleid2IDXAhWB54MKHbykC90Q6AEIMTAD#v=onepage&q=%22rhoda%20fleak%22&f=false
!REFERENCE: 1906, Past and Present of Pike County, Illinois, profile of son-in-law William L. Oakley, "William L. Oakley, living in Pleasant Hill, was for years a prosperous farmer and stock-raiser, but is now living retired. He has lived in this county since 1867, having arrived here when about twenty-eight years of age. His birth occurred in Meigs county, Ohio, on the 23d of September, 1839, his parents being Bennett and Phebe (Humphry) Oakley, both of whom were natives of the state of New York, where they were reared and married. Removing westward to Ohio, they became pioneer settlers of Meigs county. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Oakley, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. Bennett Oakley followed the occupation of farming and and also owned and operated a sawmill, being thus connected with industrial as well as agricul- tural pursuits in his home locality. He developed a good farm in Meigs county, reared his family thereon and gave his attention to the tilling of the soil for a long period. He reached the very advanced age of ninety-three years and his wife survived him for ten years, being about the same age at the time of her demise. In their family were ten children, nine of whom reached adult age, but only five are now living, namely : Mrs. Mary Armstrong, of Kansas; Mrs. Abigail Anderson, also of Kansas; Lucian and Orion, both of Missouri. William L. Oakley of this review spent the days of his boyhood upon the old home farm in Meigs county, Ohio. His educational privileges were quite limited, but his training at farm labor was not meager and he continued to assist in the work of the fields until after the inauguration of the Civil war, when in August, 1862, he res- ponded to his country's call for aid, enlisting in Company B, One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A large part of this company was made up in the schoolroom and the teacher, Edwin Keyes, was elected captain. Mr. Oakley participated in the battle of Morefield and was afterward on detached duty. Becoming ill with measles he was sent to the hospital at Cumberland, Maryland, and later was honor- ably discharged in May, 1863, on account of physical disability. Returning to his home in Ohio, where he recuperated, Mr. Oakley was then married in November, 1864, to Miss Sarah Griffin, who was born, reared and educated in Athens county, Ohio. Her father, Daniel Griffin, was also a native of that county and was married there to Rhoda Fleak, who was also born in the Buckeye state. Following his marriage Mr. Oakley re- sided in Ohio for two years and in 1867 came to Illinois, settling in Pike county, where he engaged in the cultivation of a rented farm for several years. During that time he carefully saved his earnings and then purchased seventy acres of land, after which he began the improvement of this property which he transformed into a highly cultivated tract. He has built upon this a good house, has fenced the place, has planted an orchard and in connection with the tilling of the soil he raised and fed stock. In 1891, how- ever, he sold the farm and removed to Pleasant Hill, where he purchased a lot and erected a neat substantial residence, which he now occupies. Unto Mr. and Mrs Oakley have been born three children: Charles, who was postmaster at Pleasant Hill about thirteen years resigning on account of poor health and is now living in the state of Washington; Lucian E., who is married to Archie R. Taylor, of St. Louis, Missouri, and follows furniture and undertaking business in Pleasant Hill; and Clarence, who was married to Winona Harvey, of Nebo, Illinois, and holds a position in the Pleasant Hill post office. They have one son, Everett E. The family have long occupied an enviable position in social circles in this community. Politically Mr. Oakley is a republican and his sons have followed in his footsteps in this direction. He has been without aspiration for office, however, preferring that his time and energies should be given to other interests. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Pleasant Hill and he holds relations with the Knights of Honor, the Modern Woodmen and the Grand Army post at Pleasant Hill. He is one of the few surviving veterans of the Civil war and he takes great pleasure in meeting with his old army comrades around the camp fires held by the post in this village. In a review of his life work it is seen that his chief characteristics have been commendable and that in his relations with his fellowmen he has never been neglectful of the duties nor obligations which devolve upon him. He has taken life seriously, has performed his full share of the world's work and as a citizen and business man has made a creditable record. Now in the evening of life he is enabled to enjoy a well earned rest amid the comforts and luxuries which go to make life worth living.", https://archive.org/stream/pastpresentofpik00mass/...ofpik00mass_djvu.txt
!REFERENCE: OneWorldTree65, Rhoda Fleak, 8 children
Spouses
Birth24 Apr 1816, DE1
Death8 Mar 1871, Athens, OH1
BurialBethel Cemetery, Coolville, Athens, OH1
Misc. Notes
!BIRTH-DEATH-BURIAL: Bethel Cemetery, Coolville, Athens, OH1, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/130056052
!CENSUS: 23-Sep-1850 Troy, Athens, OH, 1001/1019, Daniel Griffin, children Edward Griffin, Amanda Griffin, Sarah Griffin, John M. Griffin
!CENSUS: 11-Jul-1860 Troy, Athens, OH, 805/785, Daniel Griffin, 8 children including son Edward Griffin
!CENSUS: 06-Jul-1870 Troy, Athens, OH, 58/57, Daniel Griffin, 6 children including son Mather Griffin and daughter Ida J. Griffin
!OCCUPATION: Farmer
!REFERENCE: 1904, son Matthew D. Griffin (Mather Daniel Griffin), https://books.google.com/books?id=yf40AQAAMAAJ&...=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiXleid2IDXAhWB54MKHbykC90Q6AEIMTAD#v=onepage&q=%22rhoda%20fleak%22&f=false
!REFERENCE: 1906, Past and Present of Pike County, Illinois, profile of son-in-law William L. Oakley, "William L. Oakley, living in Pleasant Hill, was for years a prosperous farmer and stock-raiser, but is now living retired. He has lived in this county since 1867, having arrived here when about twenty-eight years of age. His birth occurred in Meigs county, Ohio, on the 23d of September, 1839, his parents being Bennett and Phebe (Humphry) Oakley, both of whom were natives of the state of New York, where they were reared and married. Removing westward to Ohio, they became pioneer settlers of Meigs county. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Oakley, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war. Bennett Oakley followed the occupation of farming and and also owned and operated a sawmill, being thus connected with industrial as well as agricul- tural pursuits in his home locality. He developed a good farm in Meigs county, reared his family thereon and gave his attention to the tilling of the soil for a long period. He reached the very advanced age of ninety-three years and his wife survived him for ten years, being about the same age at the time of her demise. In their family were ten children, nine of whom reached adult age, but only five are now living, namely : Mrs. Mary Armstrong, of Kansas; Mrs. Abigail Anderson, also of Kansas; Lucian and Orion, both of Missouri. William L. Oakley of this review spent the days of his boyhood upon the old home farm in Meigs county, Ohio. His educational privileges were quite limited, but his training at farm labor was not meager and he continued to assist in the work of the fields until after the inauguration of the Civil war, when in August, 1862, he res- ponded to his country's call for aid, enlisting in Company B, One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. A large part of this company was made up in the schoolroom and the teacher, Edwin Keyes, was elected captain. Mr. Oakley participated in the battle of Morefield and was afterward on detached duty. Becoming ill with measles he was sent to the hospital at Cumberland, Maryland, and later was honor- ably discharged in May, 1863, on account of physical disability. Returning to his home in Ohio, where he recuperated, Mr. Oakley was then married in November, 1864, to Miss Sarah Griffin, who was born, reared and educated in Athens county, Ohio. Her father, Daniel Griffin, was also a native of that county and was married there to Rhoda Fleak, who was also born in the Buckeye state. Following his marriage Mr. Oakley re- sided in Ohio for two years and in 1867 came to Illinois, settling in Pike county, where he engaged in the cultivation of a rented farm for several years. During that time he carefully saved his earnings and then purchased seventy acres of land, after which he began the improvement of this property which he transformed into a highly cultivated tract. He has built upon this a good house, has fenced the place, has planted an orchard and in connection with the tilling of the soil he raised and fed stock. In 1891, how- ever, he sold the farm and removed to Pleasant Hill, where he purchased a lot and erected a neat substantial residence, which he now occupies. Unto Mr. and Mrs Oakley have been born three children: Charles, who was postmaster at Pleasant Hill about thirteen years resigning on account of poor health and is now living in the state of Washington; Lucian E., who is married to Archie R. Taylor, of St. Louis, Missouri, and follows furniture and undertaking business in Pleasant Hill; and Clarence, who was married to Winona Harvey, of Nebo, Illinois, and holds a position in the Pleasant Hill post office. They have one son, Everett E. The family have long occupied an enviable position in social circles in this community. Politically Mr. Oakley is a republican and his sons have followed in his footsteps in this direction. He has been without aspiration for office, however, preferring that his time and energies should be given to other interests. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church of Pleasant Hill and he holds relations with the Knights of Honor, the Modern Woodmen and the Grand Army post at Pleasant Hill. He is one of the few surviving veterans of the Civil war and he takes great pleasure in meeting with his old army comrades around the camp fires held by the post in this village. In a review of his life work it is seen that his chief characteristics have been commendable and that in his relations with his fellowmen he has never been neglectful of the duties nor obligations which devolve upon him. He has taken life seriously, has performed his full share of the world's work and as a citizen and business man has made a creditable record. Now in the evening of life he is enabled to enjoy a well earned rest amid the comforts and luxuries which go to make life worth living.", https://archive.org/stream/pastpresentofpik00mass/...ofpik00mass_djvu.txt
!REFERENCE: OneWorldTree65, Daniel Griffin, parents Martin Griffin and Anna Tull, 8 children
Marriage19 Dec 1839, Athens, OH175
Last Modified 16 Nov 2018Created 13 May 2019 http://willbraffitt.org/roots/
13 May 2019 http://willbraffitt.org/roots/